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  • in reply to: Chelate agents #3728
    CamZ
    Moderator

    Yes, major nutrients can be chelated and are avaliable if you want them. It’s far less important to due so though because they are the most abundant component in a given mix, whether synthetic or organic.

    I doubt that it would be any stronger of a ph down than humic or fulvic acids and would not suggest using it for that due to expense of use.

    in reply to: Yellow Leaf #3725
    CamZ
    Moderator

    Do you have a picture of the whole plant?

    in reply to: Specific Dosing Per Plant for RDWC Reservoir Tank #3724
    CamZ
    Moderator

    Ahh, I understand now. For silica it depends on the type of silica you use. If you use monosilicic acid then you need to add it less often, but if you use potassium silicate then it is most beneficial within 72 hours after you mix your stock solution.

    Monosilicic acid is supposed to stay in solution without reacting with other components in your fertilizer. Monosilicic acid is great, but very expensive, and there are concerns about exactly how much more bioavalible it is to the plant. It doesn’t alter ph either, which could be good or bad depending on your viewpoint.

    On the other hand there is potassium silicate, which is cheaper, but does alter ph. For me personally, I use potassium silicate for 2 reasons. The first I have already stated, it costs less. The second reason has to do with ph. I have found that if I mix potassium silicate in my solution with my dry nutrients I get a perfect ph between 5.8 and 6.3 without the addition of ph up or down. The solution also fluctuates far less than when its not added. No matter if I’m adding water only or a full mix batch of nutrients, I add a full 12.5ml of potassium silicate per 5 gallon bucket. The reason I add it every time has to do with its avalibility in solution. I want to maintain some in solution at all times. I add water roughly every 2-3 days, which just happens to be the best effective range for potassium silicate. I believe that it’s supposed to fall out of solution after this point, but I never see any precipitate in my solution personally, though I do run a live res.

    Unless you have lab equipment to analyze your solution, there is no way accurately know what’s in it on a ppm level, which is why growers use overall ec and ppm readings for a general idea. Over time these elements get unbalanced as the plants use less of one nutrient than another. Elements periodically combine and form salts that are less solulable. Bacteria and enzymes can help keep these salts from building up in my opinion and experience, helping to keep nutrients in solulble form.

    Mono and orthosilicic acid are great. I have had wonderful success with monosilicic acid. It creates very strong stems and thicker leaves without a doubt. Potassium silicate also does the same thing, though perhaps not quite as efficiently. What I can say is that running hydro without silica is a mistake. Flimsy weak stems suck. Not having pm and pest defense sucks. Who wouldn’t want better nutrient absorption and stress tolerance?

    Once again, I hope you find this useful.

     

    in reply to: rockwool never again #3723
    CamZ
    Moderator

    I’m glad you found value in my response. One thing to make sure you focus on growing in all mediums is proper dryback. Every single medium has the potential to drown a seedling when oversaturated. Once they are moisture stressed it becomes very easy for them to become infected with pathogens, hence the root inoculant.

    in reply to: Old tech meets new tech?? #3718
    CamZ
    Moderator

    Happy to help! Don’t forget the to use his promo code at checkout if you order from their site. I believe it’s Mrgrowit15.

    in reply to: Chelate agents #3716
    CamZ
    Moderator

    Beware bold claims. Third party testing is king. There is no product verification in this space. Chelating agents are great, but a simple fulvic/humic acid will do the same work. Does this product have any backing for these claims?

    in reply to: rockwool never again #3715
    CamZ
    Moderator

    Rockwool isn’t the most economic choice, but believe it or not, it’s very good at controlling root moisture. You might want to inspect your conditions and clean. Sorry you lost such expensive genetics. Consider a root inoculant in the future to help mitigate this issue if you haven’t already.

    in reply to: Old tech meets new tech?? #3714
    CamZ
    Moderator

    You could add a plug adapter that aci sells to control the light on and off. No intensity control through the controller though. An analog controller would cost less, but an aci controlled plug would remember lights on and off times in the event of a power outage.

     

    https://acinfinity.com/hydroponics-growers/controllers/smart-uis-controllers/uis-control-plug-for-outlet-powered-equipment/?gad_source=1&gclid=Cj0KCQiAxOauBhCaARIsAEbUSQSyMZJxx0oQiREamRfedfLf6z52YzjPwHuItzVSiKmMcsSxVzWAU-oaAlW9EALw_wcB#product-description

    in reply to: Making a timelapse #3713
    CamZ
    Moderator

    Post the link in a new forum post when it’s finished. I would love to see it.

    in reply to: Specific Dosing Per Plant for RDWC Reservoir Tank #3712
    CamZ
    Moderator

    I highly suggest you check out green genes garden channel. His older videos are particularly helpful in understanding ppms for hydroponics. Sadly, not even he grows rdwc, but it can give you a better understanding of the process as a whole. Aside from telling you what I grow with and why, I can’t give you information specific to your situation because I didn’t design and am unfamiliar with your system. What I can tell you is that the reservoir application does not apply to number of plants, however, the ml per gallon reccomendation for nutrients is generally based off of drain to waste style gardening. For instance, 5ml per gallon of calmag is something you might want to run in coco, but you may run the lowest dose in rdwc.

    1. A cheat rule to understanding feeding in rdwc looks like this; measure out 5 gallons of ro or low ppm water.
    2. Note your initial ppm/ec.
    3. Add silica first always and do so at full strength, then calmag, then your base nutrient followed by additives if you run them.
    4. Add a full dose of each item as if you only had 2 gallons of water instead of 5.
    5. Measure ppm/ec and ph in your 5 gallon bucket.
    6. If less than your ideal range, add 1 more gallons worth of nutrients. If more, add water.

    Once you have your initial ratio of water to nutrients figured out, divide your system volume by 5. Then next time you can add your water and add each item with its own 5 gallon bucket to prevent lockout problems. (For instance, 1st 5 gallon bucket you add all your silica, 2nd bucket has all the calmag, 3rd has base, 4th bucket additives.) Technically, you should mix every bucket as you go, but I have never had an issue doing it this way and it’s much faster. Just make sure you allow time for the salts to enter solution.</p>

    1. .4-.8 for early veg, .8-1.2 late veg, 1.2-1.6 for the remainder of flower. Generally 1.2 during stretch to limit node spacing and jump to 1.6 after week 3 to force more calyx growth. 5.8 ph is ideal in veg and 6.3 is best for flower, but anywhere between 5.5 and 6.5 is acceptable. Try to chase ph as little as possible.
    2. If your system is dialed in right then you can use the same water until ph starts to tank. I can typically go 3 to 4 weeks before encountering this issue, though your experience may vary. Generally, you will end up with an imbalance of nutrients at some point, typically excess sulfur, and that will start to make it hard to keep ph up. At this point, change your water. Again, the suggested practice is changing water every 7-10 days, but if you know what you are doing and understand some of the basic science on nutrient interaction you can go much longer.
    3. When it’s time to top off the res you read the ec and ph of your res. If your ec is high, add water only, if it’s low, add a stronger mix to hit your range. The longer you do it, the easier it gets to hit your target.

    I hope this helps.

    Regarding the amount of water. You add water until it reaches the bottom of your net pot until you get roots in the water and then allow the level to drop to an inch below the net pot. If using litres vs gallon, convert everything i said to litres and follow the same process.

    in reply to: Yellow Leaf #3711
    CamZ
    Moderator

    <p style=”text-align: left;”>Ph problems normally cause interveinal chlorosis (yellowing between leaf veins). That appears to be a nitrogen deficiency. Is that from the bottom of the plant?</p>

    in reply to: Maybe light burn close to harvest #3668
    CamZ
    Moderator

    Based on your pictures and the fact that you said all trichomes are cloudy, I would guess you are within the 2 week window from harvest. I would cut nutrients entirely at this point and do a minor flush to try and get rid of some of that nitrogen. The nitrogen is what will really make your plants harsh. Excess nitrogen will create an overabundance of chlorophyll, leading to harsh smoke. That might be light burn, but the pattern doesn’t seem right to me. The very top of the one plant may have experienced a bit of light stress based on the foxtailing and yellow sugar leaves, but the lower fans are likely another issue. It sounds like you aren’t using nutrients, just a premix. Correct?

    in reply to: Maybe light burn close to harvest #3657
    CamZ
    Moderator

    You have a couple issues I can see from the pictures. You are right, there are some nutrient issues. You have nitrogen toxcicity and a potassium deficiency or a lockout. Is there any other info you can give? Ppm? Nutrients? Anything of the sort.

    It’s hard to give advice on so little info.

    in reply to: Mother plant/ genetics questions #3656
    CamZ
    Moderator

    Happy to help man. I’m a bit of a info junky myself.

    in reply to: Mother plant/ genetics questions #3649
    CamZ
    Moderator

    My apologies. The concentration was .02 and .05 and the durations were 6, 12, and 24 hours.

    A study on natural occurrence.

    https://www.mdpi.com/2223-7747/12/23/3927

    Detailed information on hops, a close cousin.

    https://iung.pl/PJA/wydane/34/PJA34str3_10.pdf

    A study on hemp.

    https://journals.ashs.org/hortsci/view/journals/hortsci/55/10/article-p1703.xml

     

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 269 total)